Frequently Asked Questions

What if I'm not Jewish?

We are Jews and non-Jews worshiping together, and therefore, you will be welcomed with open arms.  While as a Messianic congregation, we make no apologies for our very focused and specific calling and vision to bring the Gospel of Messiah to our unbelieving Jewish brothers and sisters, we hold no hierarchy between Jews and Gentiles. A redeemed soul is a redeemed soul, and the angels in Heaven rejoice over each and every one!  Our congregation has many non-Jewish people who love the Lord, who have a heart to see the salvation of “all Israel” (Romans 11:26), and to that end have developed a deep appreciation for the beauty and richness of Jewish life and culture. 

If you are not Jewish, we welcome you, just as you are.  To summarize what Rav Shaul (the Apostle Paul) wrote in his first letter to the congregation at Corinth, Be who God made you to be! (1 Corinthians 7:17-20).  And the love that God has placed in your heart for Jewish people and for Jewish life and culture will be a blessing to this congregation and to the Body of Messiah as a whole! 

 

What Should I Wear?

Our heart on this question is one of sensitivity and freedom versus one of imposition

For example, a man might ask, “Should I wear a Kippah/Yarmulke/skullcap?”  Do you have to?  Is it some sort of requirement?  Of course not.  There is no requirement to wear a kippa.  In Romans 14:17, (I recommend reading the whole chapter), the Rav Shaul is basically saying, The kingdom of God is ultimately not about all of these peripheral questions, but it’s about righteousness, shalom, and joy in the Holy Spirit.  However, in our context wearing a kippa sends a wonderful message to our Jewish people.  It’s a sign of cultural identification.  It’s a small, easy, and loving way to communicate, “This place is for you... this is Jewish-friendly... this is Jewish space.  You’ve found the right spot.”  It’s not about mandates and requirements, etc.  Rather, it’s about being motivated by the love of God in all we do.

We do recommend that you dress modestly and in a way that you feel expresses reverence and honor unto the Lord.  For some, their standard may equate to a suit and tie.  For others, it might be jeans and a t-shirt.  There is room and freedom for both!  We are Temple Beth Yachad, “House of Unity,” not “House of Uniformity.” Ultimately, the Lord is not nearly as concerned about our what is on the outside as He is about what is on the inside.  Just bring Him yourself (Romans 12:1).